Rodney Williams: The Help Owls Need

In all sports, plugging holes—real or perceived—is part of The Process that allows a good team to become a great team.

In basketball, it’s a lot easier than football.

There are only 10 guys on the floor at a time and five of them are the good guys.

It’s a lot simpler if you are a Sixers’ fan today because all you have to do to supplant Boston in the NBA East over the next five years is get rid of Robert Covington and replace him with LeBron James.

junior

For Temple football, it’s a little harder because there 11 good guys on the field at a time and more holes to plug.

Without a doubt, though, head coach Geoff Collins plugged the biggest defensive hole last week by getting a graduate transfer

The latest good guy is Rodney Williams, who not only started 21 games at the Power 5 level for Syracuse but is coming home to finish his career at Temple.

Safety, the position Williams plays, is area of need for the Owls. They have a projected first-round NFL draft selection in Delvon Randall holding down one spot and both other safeties, Benny Walls and Keyvone Bruton, have had outstanding springs.

Having a great spring is one thing.

Having a great career is another.

Williams has had a great career at Syracuse and he’s coming home to play for a guy in Collins who has an outstanding reputation of producing NFL-ready defensive backs.

Plus, Temple football has won a whole lot more games than Syracuse football has over the last three years and winning is more fun than losing.

The Owls were expected to have a good team this season. Williams and his play-making ability makes them significantly better.

Wednesday: Settling The Greatest Team Debate

Friday: Temple TUFF and Temple Soft

11 thoughts on “Rodney Williams: The Help Owls Need

  1. Speaking of the Sixers, I was at Parx Casino and saw the Celtics hit a basket with 1.7 seconds left, got up and started walking out of the building. One minute later, I hear a loud roar. Thinking they had won on a half-court buzzer beater, I ran back. Unfortunately, they only tied.

  2. What I was not able to post is a comment that the Owls should make contact with the Imotep kid who had his scholarship revoked by PSU after being arrested for robbery. Owls could use as a hook the process they used with Bernard Pierce.

  3. Mike

    This almost certainly cannot be a move that hurts, but how great a player can this kid really be?

    Why is he leaving Syracuse??i tend to think it us because they have recruits who may push fior his playing time.

    He’ll help the Owls, but us this more of a case in which Temple is getting table scraps of a middling power 5 rather than some big steal??

    • Not saying he’s great, Jf, but any time you can get a safety who has 21 starts under his belt at a Power 5 school, it’s a big, big, plus. Bigger plus would be if Benny or Keyvone would beat him out but judging from his film Junior is obviously a very accomplished player against better competition than Temple faces. Big difference that our grad transfer comes from the ACC this year versus our grad transfer coming from the MEAAC last year. I think he’s far from a scrap. A scrap would be a guy who signed at ‘Cuse who could never get on the field there.

  4. Did Mike Jones totally blow his opportunity to play in the NFL by coming to Temple? #embracedebate

    • After the unearned penalty during the Houston game ( I believe it was the Houston game), he played tentatively. The whole defensive backfield was mediocre this season. I blame it on mediocre coaching.

  5. Mike Jones ? In watching him last year, I did not see much of that extra special value plays coming from him. I thought, with his pre-announced pedigree ( make that hype ) we were to see a champ out there, especially since AAC was not group of great players.
    Since Temple Football did get about 8 NFL draft or invites, then to me, it was a sure thing TU FB does get recognized by Pro’s.
    Must be they saw something lacking , and not use a draft pick for him….

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